the best breast pump

Posted by Cesario Tarigan | 2:56 PM | , | 2 comments »

What is the best breast pump a pregnant women can buy?

Someone in yahoo! Answer asking this. And the best answer is :
I used many affordable breast pumps after I had my two kids. None worked for me except for this one. All the others took me at least 45 minutes to pump what I needed. This one isn't very affordable but I highly recommend it. If you buy the cheaper ones your wasting your money and you can't return breast pumps. I bought all the cheap ones and then bought this one. I would have saved tons if someone had told me just to buy the expensive one.

Medela Pump In Style Breast Pump with Shoulder Bag $279.99



Is that true?

Do You Really Need A Breast Pump?

Not all breastfeeding moms need a breast pump! My sister-in-law has nursed four kids into toddlerhood without a breast pump. I nursed one child for just over a year and used four different breast pumps - one rental and three purchased. If you won't need to pump breast milk regularly and you have a good milk supply, you may want to learn how to hand-express milk.

If you're breastfeeding, you probably want your baby to benefit from your milk even when you're not available. Whether you're getting ready to go back to work or you just want someone else to feed your child while you get some rest or go out, a breast pump can be a big help.

There are several different types of breast pumps to choose from. Whichever pump you pick, it's a good idea to have it ready to go well before you return to work or leave your baby with a sitter.

In fact, because many babies will refuse a bottle offered later on, it's best to start pumping and introduce a bottle as soon as breastfeeding is established, when your baby's 3 or 4 weeks old. To keep her willing to take the bottle, offer it with an ounce or two of breast milk inside at least every three or four days.

How and Where Will You Use It?

If you are returning to work and pumping breast milk every day, or pumping exclusively, you need a more powerful breast pump than someone who only pumps breast milk on one side while nursing on the other. Will you have time to pump one breast at a time, or do you need a double breast pump? Also consider whether you will have access to electricity when you are pumping. If not, you may need a manual or battery breast pump. If you travel a lot, your breast pump should be light and portable.

Manual Pumps

A manual breast pump is a cheap, portable option for those who pump up to one time per day. Manual breast pumps can be tiring to use, though, and may not be be effective enough for those who pump several times per day. Manual breast pumps are reliable, though, since they have no mechanical parts to break down. Avoid bicycle horn style manual pumps. Though cheap, they can damage breast tissue and harbor bacteria in the rubber suction bulb, which is difficult to clean.

Battery-Powered Pumps

While battery-powered breast pumps may still be available, they are not as popular as manual and electric breast pumps, and are not often recommended by lactation consultants or doctors. Battery pumps cycle much slower than a baby's sucking pattern and are much less powerful than a baby's suck, and therefore may cause a drop in milk supply if used daily for expressing milk. Battery breast pumps are easily portable, but they require frequent battery replacements and may break down a lot.

Electric Pumps

Electric breast pumps are the choice for mothers returning to work full-time or pumping exclusively. These breast pumps usually express breast milk from both breasts at once and most closely imitate a baby's sucking pattern, which helps maintain milk supply. Popular accessories include car AC adapters, built-in milk coolers, travel cases and hands-free kits. The downside to electric pumps is price. Expect to spend $200-$300 to buy a good electric breast pump.